women's rights

Video: Talking about Domestic Violence

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This recent campaign video from South African women's rights organisation, People Opposing Women Abuse (POWA), confronts the long standing problem of domestic violence being ignored by those who witness it.

Why we like it

VWR Participant Profile: Farah Abdel Sater

Farah Abdel Sater

Farah Abdel Sater, now 24, became involved in civil society at the age of 16 when she started teaching French to Palestinian refugees in Lebanon. Since then she has volunteered for a number of NGOs and projects advocating for social change in Lebanon. In 2009, she founded the United Nations Youth Association of Lebanon (UNYA Leb) in Beirut where she is the president today.

Animation and Comics: The Adventures of Salwa

Salwa animation - IndyAct

The Adventures of Salwa is a campaign from IndyAct Lebanon to tackle sexual harassment and get girls and women to fight back and defend themselves (which the lead character, Salwa, quite literally does with her red handbag as her weapon).

Photography: The Blank Noise Project

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The idea that the way a woman dresses invites sexual harassment or rape is a familiar one. It is used as a means to undermine survivors' allegations in court cases, in the media and by perpetrators themselves to justify their actions. The Blank Noise Project in India challenges these preconceptions, arguing that if this is really the case, then why do women in everyday, non-revealing clothing still have harassment stories to tell?

Illustration: Ninjabi Comics

Ninjabi Comic Strip

Ninjabi is a word made up by combining 'ninja' and 'hijabi'. Ninjabi is a comic-strip created by a group of four people who go by the aliases Amethyst, Diamond, Muskaan and Elysium. Ninjabi features a young woman called Noor and her group of friends living in the United States. Ninjabi subverts stereotypes about what it means to be a young woman who wears a hijab, a simple piece of cloth that has come to be much-maligned outside the Arab world.

Animated films: Put Women's Equality Back on Track

Women's Equality in Canada

A coalition of women’s rights organisation in Canada called Women's Equality produced short animation films in a series called 'Put Equality Back on Track'. Women's organisations wanted to bring attention to the fact that Stephen Harper, the serving President elected in 2006, had not stuck to his promises to further women's rights. Canada is a signatory to UN conventions and charters on women's rights but have not followed through on it's commitments.

Infographic: Women's Attitudes to Domestic Violence

Gender Violence

This info-graphic was presented as a screen shot in the Global Health Magazine. The graphic depicts figures as high as 90% (Jordan) of women aged 15-49 responding in the affirmative when asked if a husband or partner is justified in hitting or beating his wife under certain circumstances. The information in the graph comes from the UNICEF's Child Info website: Monitoring the Situation of Women and Children.

Why We like it

Information Design: We the Women

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To generate social dialogue on the ban against women driving in Saudi Arabia, Areej Khan, a Saudi artist and graphic designer living in the US, created this innovative sticker campaign.The project received news media attention in Saudi Arabia and in the US and created plenty of discussion online. "Most of the people participating on the Facebook page are against women driving," said Areej. "There’s back and forth and debate on the group. I had to be prepared that I can’t control what this is at the end. It’s about finding a solution as community, not what I think or am attached to."

HarassMap

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The bustling, colourful streets of Cairo are infamous for being unsafe for women. According to the Egyptian Centre for Women's Rights, street based sexual harassment has become part of women's everyday lives and conversations. ECWR found that 83% of Egyptian women and 93% of foreign women reported being harassed by men on the streets; 62% of men admitted to harassing women.

Media Campaign: Khede Kasra

The Khede Kasra campaign

The immensely popular and internationally recognised, Khede Kasra campaign, raised awareness about gender equality in Lebanon and in the Arabic language in general by focusing on a simple symbol; the symbol in Arabic that makes a word female or clear that something is addressed to a woman.

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